Autumn TBR 2017

As autumn rolls in and the jackets come out of the attic, I’m always inclined to pick up a collection of poetry or personal essay. There’s something about delving into someone’s more personal writing that feels cozy as the colors become more golden and the air gets colder every night. This—paired with the fact that October has a lot of exciting new releases this year—means I have a slightly longer “to be read” pile than usual. It dominates one half of my desk in a precarious tower. It leans and beckons me to delve in. 

Each synopsis has been taken either directly from the back of the book or from Goodreads. Click each cover to be linked straight to each novel’s Goodreads page. 

 

A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume

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Struggling to cope with urban life-and life in general—Frankie, a twenty-something artist,retreats to her family’s rural house on “turbine hill,” vacant since her grandmother’s death three years earlier. It is in this space, surrounded by countryside and wild creatures, that she can finally grapple with the chain of events that led her here-her shaky mental health, her difficult time in art school-and maybe, just maybe, regain her footing in art and life. As Frankie picks up photography once more, closely examining the natural world around her, she reconsiders seminal works of art and their relevance.

With “prose that makes sure we look and listen,” Sara Baume has written an elegant novel that is as much an exploration of wildness, the art world, mental illness, and community as it is a profoundly beautiful and powerful meditation on life.

 

 

Note to Self by Connor Franta

In his New York Times bestselling memoir, A Work in Progress, Connor Franta shared hisjourney from small-town Midwestern boy to full-fledged Internet sensation. Exploring his past with humor and astounding insight, Connor reminded his fans of why they first fell in love with him on YouTube—and revealed to newcomers how he relates to his millions of dedicated followers.

Now, two years later, Connor is ready to bring to light a side 31443393.jpgof himself he’s rarely shown on or off camera. In this diary-like look at his life since A Work In Progress, Connor talks about his battles with clinical depression, social anxiety, self-love, and acceptance; his desire to maintain an authentic self in a world that values shares and likes over true connections; his struggles with love and loss; and his renewed efforts to be in the moment—with others and himself.

Told through short essays, letters to his past and future selves, poetry, and original photography, Note to Self is a raw, in-the-moment look at the fascinating interior life of a young creator turning inward in order to move forward.

 

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell 15837671.jpgPickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis.

Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.

 

La Belle Sauvage: The Book of Dust #1 by Philip Pullman

“I’ve always wanted to tell the story of how Lyra came to be 34128219.jpgliving at Jordan College, and in thinking about it, I discovered a long story that began when she was a baby and will end when she’s grown up.” — Philip Pullman

Eleven-year-old Malcolm Polstead and his dæmon, Asta, live with his parents at the Trout Inn near Oxford. Across the River Thames (which Malcolm navigates often using his beloved canoe, a boat by the name of La Belle Sauvage) is the Godstow Priory where the nuns live. Malcolm learns they have a guest with them, a baby by the name of Lyra Belacqua…

 

Every Day by David Levithan

Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every 13262783.jpgday in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

 

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera33385229.jpg

On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure and to live a lifetime in a single day.

 

 

 

Photo credit – Alisa Anton on Unsplash
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4 thoughts on “Autumn TBR 2017

    1. I just finished it last night! I really enjoyed the journey of Mateo and Rufus on their last day. I got to see them grow from the beginning of the story to the end, and the end *sniff* let’s just say the title doesn’t prepare you for the feels. I recommend it! Also, keep on the lookout- I’ll be putting a review up for it in the next few days!

      Liked by 1 person

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